San Haven Sanatorium, North Dakota Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)[[MORE]]motionblur:According to the local “caretaker”, San Haven Sanatorium was abandoned in 1982.

From the North Dakota government website:

Originally known as the Institution for the Feeble-Minded, the name was changed in the 1930’s to Grafton State School to recognize the training emphasis at the facility. In the early 1960’s the San Haven Tuberculosis Sanitarium near Dunseith, N.D., became a satellite facility. Like most facilities in the United States for people with developmental disabilities, the Grafton State School reached its peak population in the late 1960s. At that time, about 1,300 people were served per day through the San Haven and Grafton locations. Admissions decreased and population levels began to fall when special educational services became available in school districts starting in the late 1960s/early 1970’s.

San Haven Sanatorium, North Dakota

Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

motionblur:

According to the local “caretaker”, San Haven Sanatorium was abandoned in 1982.

From the North Dakota government website:

Originally known as the Institution for the Feeble-Minded, the name was changed in the 1930’s to Grafton State School to recognize the training emphasis at the facility. In the early 1960’s the San Haven Tuberculosis Sanitarium near Dunseith, N.D., became a satellite facility. Like most facilities in the United States for people with developmental disabilities, the Grafton State School reached its peak population in the late 1960s. At that time, about 1,300 people were served per day through the San Haven and Grafton locations. Admissions decreased and population levels began to fall when special educational services became available in school districts starting in the late 1960s/early 1970’s.